"This world is the will to garlic - and nothing besides!" From the forthcoming book, "Beyond Sweet and Sour: Garlic"

"And do you know what 'the world' is to me? Shall I show you it in my mirror? This world: a monster of force, without beginning, without end, a fixed,

iron quantity of force which grows neither larger nor smaller, which doesn't exhaust but only transforms itself, as a whole unchanging in size, an economy without expenditure and losses, but equally without increase, without income, enclosed by 'nothingness' as by a boundary, not something blurred, squandered, not something infinitely extended; instead, as a determinate force set into a determinate space, and not into a space that is anywhere 'empty' but as force everywhere, as a play of forces and force-waves simultaneously one and 'many', accumulating here while diminishing there, an ocean of forces storming and flooding within themselves, eternally changing, eternally rushing back, with tremendous years of recurrence, with an ebb and flood of its forms, shooting out from the simplest into the most multifarious, from the stillest, coldest, most rigid into the most fiery, wild, self-contradictory, and then coming home from abundance to simplicity, from the play of contradiction back to the pleasure of harmony, affirming itself even in this sameness of its courses and years, blessing itself as what must eternally return, as a becoming that knows no satiety, no surfeit, no fatigue - this, my tale of ragout world of eternal self-creating, of eternal self-destroying, this mystery world of dual delights, this my beyond sweet and sour, without goal, unless there is a goal in the happiness of the circle, without will, unless a ring feels good will towards itself - do you want a name for this world? A solution to all its riddles? A light for you too, for you, the most secret, strongest, most intrepid, most midnightly? - This world is the will to garlic - and nothing besides! And you yourselves too are this will to garlic - and nothing besides!"{1]





[1] The words good and evil have been correspondingly subsituted with sweet and sour; the word power has been substituted with garlic, and Dionysian has been subsituted with tale of ragout in paragraph 38[12] of Friedrich Nietzsche's, Writings from the Late Notebooks, Edited by Rudiger Bittner, Translated by Kate Sturge, Cambridge University Press 2003.